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    Eric Newton, Senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, is aware of the major changes in media that journalists need to embrace. His idea is one must create and embrace the crazy ideas. He pointed out that each generation has grown up with a different media outlet leading the way in delivering news, a cycle that is promised to continue with the development of new technologies. As journalists, we must embrace the outlets for news as much as the stories themselves. The world has come a long way from the first printings of books and pamphlets to what he labeled the “digital” age. Newton suggests the future of news sharing will become even quicker and delivered in a more personal matter the farther we go into the future.

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    Tonight’s Must See Monday program was comprised of a topic both fascinating and eye-opening in terms of the way I see the world. Eric Newton, advisor to the president of the Knight Foundation, spoke to the crowd about advancements of mankind and just how much progress we, as a species, have made since the year 1767. He divided time periods of new innovation into different categories and then described the impact of each upon the world. A piece of information I found to be intriguing was that about every 80 years a crisis occurs. Think about it. The civil war, WWIII and 9/11 have all been enacted out of conflict, even though accessible materials of the time are totally different. The world as we know it has evolved and humans have created great things; however, this knowledge could be just as destructive as it is beneficiary to mankind. With advancements in journalistic methods also means advancements in nuclear devices, cyber bullying and nanotechnology. Newton theorized that this will all inevitably lead to WW3.0, an invisible war of the digital age. He explains that the printed newspaper cannot continue to coexist with new forms of mass media, and its steady decline will come to an end in the year 2040. He also believes that by this time, all data will be universally transparent once it is admitted into any computer. This is because all humans have an incessant need to tell, and new ways will be heard in every generation. It is easy to realize that predictions of modern devices were presumed long ago in past forms of media. For example, Skype in The Jetsons, cell phones in Star Trek, and even drawings of future cityscapes. Soon enough, our expectations for the future will become a reality with artificial intelligence and self-learning robots up until WW4.0. Newton presumes that this war will be the first between humanity and a non-human entity. Whether this may be technology or something unforeseen at this time, Newton chuckles at this point saying, “at least I will be long gone by this time.” Although he reminds the captivated audience that there are 7 billion reasons for any of these events not to happen, it causes the full crowd of students to sit up a little straighter in their seats when he concludes by saying “it’s crazy, so it just might happen.”

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    Eric Newton, senior adviser to the Knight Foundation, spoke tonight about the history of the future of news. He specifically noted four things about where we stand now. First, we are in a new age, a digital age, of human communication. No one knows where it is going. Second, science fiction seems to be doing a better job in bridging history and the future than the experts are. For example, the TV show “The Jetsons” introduced a concept of video chat when the show aired in the 60’s, and yet we utilize video chat and Skype today. The movie “the Matrix” voices concerns about the rise of biological intelligence and telekinesis. Third, there are undiscovered patterns in the history of news. And lastly, people in the 20’s play a key role in inventing the new news media. Newton said that every American generation has come of age with a different media invention on the rise, and that that will continue throughout the history of the world. We are currently in the cyber media stage, which emphasizes mobile and social media. Newton predicts that every 80 years there will be a crisis which will lead to an awakening. Eventually, he hypothesizes, we will end up in a world with cranial downloads and hyper media. With this, he says, what is the need for an environment when we know everything there is to know? Newton’s hypothesis raises questions that we all fear about the future and what digital media and innovations have to offer. Personally, I understand what he means when he said “First principle in predicting the future is to think crazy”, because it really is. The future of journalism and the future of the news media is something no one can predict because the digital media age is changing faster than we can keep up with it. It may seem scary to think that in our lifetime we could be living symbiotically with machines and robots, but what else can the future hold at this point? In the words of Eric Newton, “today, we are just scratching the surface of the digital age.”

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  25. Tonight’s Must See Monday was all about time travel with Eric Newton a senior advisor to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Mr. Newton laid out four points that have defined each generation of news and media one of the most important being that people in their twenties play a key role in inventing news. This point was very relevant to us as journalism students and because the majority of us are in or around our twenties. Newton gave a brief history of the news and media dating back to 1767 and ending with our generation now. Then he took the audience on time traveling trip to the year 2110 and gave his predictions of what he believes the future hold for the media. “You must be crazy,” Newton said to the audience. Throughout his explanation of his “crazy” ideas he mentioned a World War 3.0, which consists of a war that has already begun in the digital arena. Ideas of media implants and computers who talk back finally lead Newton the final point of the future: World War 4.0 humans vs. machines. All of Newton’s ideas were loosely based off of previous science fiction flicks such as “The Matrix” and “IRobot”, which seems so obvious but yet so strange. Newton then went on the end the night with his thought that our generation is “just scratching the surface of the media.” Over all this discussion was very loose and not cemented. I found it hard to take his predictions seriously when he would show us pictures of movies that had already featured this crazy idea. I guess that was the point of the discussion though, to think crazy.

  26. Eric Newton’s lecture was a very interesting one. Compared to the rest of human history, the past century has been the biggest and fastest progression of technology. Only just recently, within the last 20 years, has news and information been able to easily reach the entire world. The differences between our life style now and a couple of decades ago are dramatically different. Science fiction writers and general predictions of the future have been the idea generators for the next steps in technology. They only thought about what the future could be like, and came up with a simple representation of what they thought could actually hold the technology. The rate of technological progression lately has been explosive, and because historically, the future idea predictors have been the ones to motivate the actual creations and development of new technology, it would be a good guess to say that the predicted future ideas will continue to come about with the speed of these recent decades. However, to extrapolate the recent progression to say that within just a hundred years humans will be able to perform telekinesis and manipulate the environment around us is going too far. It would be an educated guess to say that technology will continue to advance at an exponential rate, but it is also possible that the actual progression of futuristic ideas will slow down, and the rate of technological progression will plateau. I hope I’m wrong, and that media and technology will continue to progress at these recent rates, but I have serious doubts of just how far we will actually go, or if the rate will keep up at all.

  27. Eric Newton’s presentation on the history and future of journalism was surprisingly interesting. In it, he painted a stark picture of not only the future of journalism, but also the future of the world and how it relates to the journalistic profession.Newton listed the history of journalism, as well as the theory that a new brand of media evolves with every passing generation. From the pamphlet age to our current digital media juggernaut of an existence, one can definitely see the cyclical nature of journalistic evolution. But Newton didn’t simply stop at the current age. Instead, using predictions from “The Singularity is Near” and similar books, he applied the technological outlook to journalism. With the advent of new robotic organisms and faster, more instant global dissemination, the future speed and reach of news will only expand.However, I believe the human element will fall by the wayside in the relatively new future. While the ability to deliver the news will speed up, the same can be said of how humans wish to receive the news. Long drawn out explanations will no longer be desired. They barely are now. Journalists role will decrease. People will want the information, and at most they will look to experts for analysis.

  28. This Must See Monday’s Speaker Series featured Eric Newton, Senior Advisor to the President of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. He highlighted “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 Tells Us About 2110.” Newton used history to explain and predict the future for journalism. First, he stated we must accept the fact that we are in a digital age and no one knows what is going to happen next. Every generation is growing up with different forms of media. Continual technological advances create new outlets for news, making all future generations expect different things. “We predict the future based on what we know,” which is wrong because it doesn’t open up the possibility for new ideas to come. Another interesting factor in predicting the future, is looking at Science Fiction. Because this genre dreams up new possibilities, it doesn’t limit the imagination. For example, Skype, cell phones, and the iPad were all used in science fiction entertainment decades ago. What Newton predicts for the future, is that print will die, artificial intelligence and robotics will rise, and that media will become conversational. Information will become even more public and accessible to everyone. After that will follow “Bio Media”, or actual media implants that don’t require separate gadgets. “Hyper Media” will follow that with actual cranial downloads that are delivered straight into your mind. “Omni Media” finishes it off with thought projection and telepathy. This lecture was extremely thought provoking and enlightening in expanding the horizons that media will possibly one day stretch into. It is mind blowing to fathom the ideas Newton suggested, yet they are all entirely possible.

  29. Tonight’s must-see Monday was a presentation by Eric Newton about “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 Tells Us About 2110.” He spoke of the evolving ages of ideas and movements in technology and communication since 1767. According to Newton, “Every American generation grows up with a different type of media in a sentence.” Essentially, the way we go wrong when predicting the future is by leaving it to the experts to predict based on what they know now. However, we must see the “cyclone around us,” the forward movement unleashing tremendous force. Newton talked about how science fiction, in fact, is more on track in predicting the future than the experts. Throughout the presentation he went through each age’s signature technological advancement and the probable and pressing future of World War 3.0 of cyber armies, and the importance of our “millennial” generation to innovate and transcend the limits of today, to shape the future in preparation of World War 4.0, the probability of a world war of humans against machines, wearable media, universal database transparency. In retrospect, the goal throughout all awakening and crises that occur every 80 years is to improve more truthful storytelling in all media, to change and adapt to the times as living , growing and evolving journalism.

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    Eric Newton’s presentation on the History of the Future of News wrapped up the first half of the 21st Century Media Organization and Entrepreneurship course. Newton touched on a few topics, including the new age of human communication: the digital age, how science fiction is doing a good job of predicting the future of media, undiscovered patterns in news media, and how people in their 20s play key roles in inventing the future of news media.He noted that every generation grows up with a different type of media. These started out as pamphlets, partisan weeklies and populist dailies in the 1700s. In more recent years, new forms of media have been the world wide web and social media. Newton predicted 4 future generations: visionary, hybrid, courageous and enlightened. These generations will experience forms of media that include intelligent media (artificial intelligence), bio media (media implants), hyper media (cranial downloads) and omni media (telekinesis).Newton said there is a great awakening in society every 80 years, such as a war, and one of these great awakenings in the future may be a war of humans against machines or something non-human in the enlightened generation. He noted that as of last year, the United States government considered cyberspace an area of war.The most resonating message from Newton’s presentation was that in order to predict the future, you have to “think crazy,” not just out-of-the-box crazy, but “off the planet.”

  43. In tonight’s Must See Monday, Eric Newton explained the patterns of the media, and how it is constantly changing. Newton explained how in every generation, there is a change in media, from magazines, to TV news, the internet, and mobile media. But these changes can also be noted all the way back to the American Revolution, when pamphlets advanced to newspapers, and so on. But the greatest question in the future of media is…where do we go from here? Newton showed the audience some great examples of “skyping” on The Jetsons and using cell phones on Star Trek. All that can be laughed at by American’s today. But Newton said that even the creator of the cell phone based his idea off of the show. So while we laugh at sci-fi movies and think of their technology as unimaginable, they are really not far off. Technology of the future may even soon be based off of ‘The Terminator’ or ‘Avatar.’ After all, Newton said the first principle in creating the future is to “think crazy.” I think the most interesting part of Newton’s presentation was the categories he made for future generations, listing all the way up to 2110. Will ideas and skills soon be programmed into our brains? Is there a possibility of a World War 4.0 Man vs. machine, or Man vs. nature? These ideas may seem a little far-off, but remember, one hundred years ago the idea of a cell phone seemed a little crazy too. Taking away from Newton’s presentation, it is easy to see where we all lie in the middle of this. As journalism students, we are the future, and it is our job to decide where the future of the media goes. The best minds did their greatest works in their 20’s, and as young adults, we hold the power in our hands for generations to come.

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  50. I thought it was interesting how this week’s Must See Monday was planned before the Tucson shooting occurred because the topic, “Communities in Crisis: Ethical Consideration for Journalists” is a fitting issue to discuss after such a tragedy. Nevertheless, the Must See Monday gave helpful insight on how to truthfully report and cover a crisis while remaining ethically sound that I think every journalist ought to know.Ina Jaffe from NPR West explained how she covered her first breaking news story, the Cleveland School shooting. One day, a man referred to as a loner showed up on the schoolyard and just started shooting around. Many children, mainly Southeast Asian refugees, were killed or wounded. Jaffe’s story was on how the school was patching up bullet holes, cleaning the schoolyard and planning to open the next day. Jaffe was horrified to have to stick a mic in the face of a child who just saw their classmates shot, but her editor said to not interview children. Instead, Jaffe reported on the scene and talked to people who were not children. Although children were the main ones who witnessed the event, interviewing them was crossing that ethical line that could have made the situation worse and more tragic. Children may have given insight into the horrific occurrence, but interviewing such young children would have brought more suffering.Based on his own experience covering tragedies and communities in crisis, Victor Merina from Reznet talked about the importance of observing your surroundings in addition to conducting interviews. When journalists are looking for that golden quote, they often fail at other things such as observing the location and people for the story. Observation can add much richness to stories and help the audience get a better picture of the scene. Merina also mentioned the importance of spending time with the people you interview to get a better understanding for the story. By taking that extra time to understand and make your sources feel comfortable, you build their trust and are more likely to gain helpful information for your article.I feel that this week’s Must See Monday gave valuable information and tips that many Cronkite students may need to use in their futures as journalists.

  51. Today Eric Newton, Senior Advisor to the President of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, spoke out to the public about history and the future of news. Specifically what 1767 tells us about 2100-2110. He eagerly told us that as Cronkite students we are attending the only University that is a two time winner for media innovation from the Knight Foundation. The lecture proceeded into how one may know what will happen in the future, especially to a year so far away like 2110. People in their twenties currently play key roles, people like us. Every new generation creates new news media outlets. Ever since the American Revolution, all throughout civil war and the third awakening, new medias have developed. From pamphlets to the world wide web the news world is evolving. In order to keep developing and opening our minds to newer and more intelligent ways of learning and experiencing news in our world we, as journalists, must do a number of things. We must be more creative, have truthful storytelling, watch more science fiction, understand the past and present of news etc. Basically, we must think of crazier and grandiose ways to further the development of news media in order to progress in the future.

  52. Eric Newton mentioned we all have to “think crazy—off the planet crazy” during his speech titled “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 tells us about 2110.” Newton definitely sounded crazy as he described stages of future media as Intelligent, Bio, Hyper and Omni. The next one hundred years are supposed to contain artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, media implants, cranial downloads and telekinesis, according to Newton. All this will lead to World War 4.0, humans against non-humans. Newton said 2011 is “just scratching the surface of the digital age.” Personally, I’m fine with the surface. I think where the world is with the media is decent. Newton predicted what new technology will surface based off science fiction, but why is that okay? He concluded with a war. Last time I checked, wars were not something to be looking forward to. Plus, every sci-fi novel or movie that has robots or advanced technology does not end well for humans. Shouldn’t we be trying to avoid that technological extreme? I do think technology has helped society as a whole, and I understand that it will continue to advance throughout the years. However, I feel like a line needs to be drawn or extreme precautions should be taken before experimenting with more media machines.

  53. Tonight’s Must-See Monday was presented by Dean Callahan and hosted by Eric Newton. Eric Newton is the Senior Adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Newton discussed four main topics with the audience about the future of news and comparing it to the past. 1. He stated how we are currently living in the digital age and no one can tell how it is going to turn out. 2. Science fiction has a large impact and influence on the society of journalism. 3. Each American generation comes of age as a different news medium is rising. 4. People in their 20s play a key role in inventing new news media. Newton’s presentation went on with slides of the history of how news and technology have simultaneously developed dating back to 1767. It was interesting seeing how he tied The Jetsons having a form of Skype, Star Trek having the first “cell phone” and Space Odyssey having the first “Ipad.” He then proceeded to predict the future of technology as far as 2089 along with “World War 4.0- humans against non-humans.” Not likely, right? According to Newton, “we predict the future based on what we know.” This MSM was very interesting and definitely brought my mind to places I’d never thought of before. To sum up this great discussion, Newton ended with; “To get to this future, someone’s got to shape it, and that person is you. Is that too much to handle? I don’t think so.”

  54. This week’s Must See Monday was Eric Newton and he spoke on the history of the Future of News and what the past will tell us about the future when it comes to news. To start off, Mr. Newton is the founder of Newseum, which is a very popular website. He has a very impressive resume and began the night by talking about how amazing our school is and how we should be very proud of our school. He started with four points that we should know about when it comes to the news. 1. We are in the digital age and no one knows how its really going to come out. 2. Science fiction is becoming a bigger influence in our society when it comes to journalism. 3. Undiscovered patterns in history of news, every american generation grew up with different form of media 4. People in their 20s play key roles in inventing news media. He then went on to talk about each news age we have been through over time including the visual, language, mass media and digital ages. Next he discussed the main chunk of his presentation, about where media has been and where it is going in the future. It started with the compromise generation of pamphlet news to the progressive generation of the associated press. Society then moved on to the G.I. generation of photography in print and tabloids, to Generation X with tv newscasts, and today’s cyber generation of mobile and social media. He then went on to talk about the future and our society would look like when it came to what kind of media would be dominant. It began with the visionary generation of intelligent media, went on to the hybrid generation of bio media, then the courageous generation of hyper media, and finally the enlightened generation of omni media. Mr. Newton really made me think about what news would be like in the future and how its changes would affect our society. The lecture also made me think that our journalism when it comes to tv news and print was going to become obsolete which made me somewhat depressed because he made it feel like there was nothing we could do to keep our favorite kinds of journalism around. Some of my favorite quotes from the night included, “Think crazy when predicting the future,” “Today we’re jut scratching the surface of the digital age,” and “To get to this future, someone has to shape it.” Mr. Newton concluded the night by sharing 10 things that mass communication majors can do to keep up with our changing society. A few of my favorites included, watch a lot more science fiction, understand the past and present of news, master computer assisted reporting/design and teach digital media fluency, and develop sources for covering world war 3.0. Overall, this was definitely the most interesting must see monday by far, but it also made me worry about the future more than any other lecture, but I’m pretty sure that’s what Mr. Newton wanted us to get out of his lecture. I will definitely start thinking more about the future of news and how I can keep up with it.

  55. The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication held a conference Monday night concerning entrepreneurship, while introducing four new advances in technology and journalism.The event held in the First Amendment Forum started at 7 p.m with students lining the floors and readily awaiting the conference with their computers and notebooks on hand. CJ Cornell and Dan Gillmor introduced the four speakers that presented their own companies and projects. They each brought new ideas and advances to the correlation between technology and journalism. The first speaker, Liz Smith, spoke about her creation of WatchTree. The program centers on making volunteering easy and fun for those who are interested. She has a website connected to twitter, where people may post volunteer opportunities to make it easier to find for the average person. After working years to get the program up and running, it has been a huge success thus far. “Learning what’s possible is fun,” Smith said. Following Smith’s presentation was Adam Klawonn, to speak about his program CityCircles, which gives specific information about a fixed location. On the website there are six different sections named: news, events, business, network, stuff and let’s fix it. These are all to help the visitor determine what they would like to explore. This website is to help individuals who may have just moved to a certain place. It gives information on what there is in the area and what they can engage in, in that particular location. Amanda Crawford spoke next about her program called Fictionado. It is a website similar to spark notes, but higher tech. Fictionado is a revolutionized way of reading because it puts large texts into shorter texts that are 20 pages or less. In today’s society, there are new technologies coming out such as the Ipad, Droids, etc., and this program makes it easier to read on those devices. With a subscription, people can make their own profiles and even take a picture of the bar code on a Fictionado ad and a story will pop on their technological device. “The technology aspect of this program was a challenge, hell my PowerPoint didn’t even work,” Crawford said. The final presentation was on Blimee, a new program that uses hundreds of televisions around the nation in random places to provide the news and other neat information. The creator, Marius Ciocirlan, spoke about how his goal was to get back to the old days when town criers used to shout the news instead of it being such a hassle to get to it.Their partnership with Advision Media helped to get it across the country to New York City in Times Square. This was a huge achievement, especially starting out as such a small idea. The presentation ended with Cornell taking questions from the audience and thanking the speakers once again. The success of these people is one that every aspiring entrepreneur should have seen.Ciocirlan ended with saying,” Seeing people use your product is the most rewarding thing.”

  56. Howdy! This post could not be written any better! Reading through this article reminds me of my previous roommate! He continually kept talking about this. I most certainly will forward this post to him. Fairly certain he’ll have a very good read. Many thanks for sharing!

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  58. With the closing of tonight’s Must See Monday, I wasn’t sure if I should be excited for the coming age of journalism or afraid of an out-dated sci-fi movie becoming a reality. That in mind, I wasn’t sure how valid Eric Newton’s projections for the coming 100 years or so were. Granted, history does show us a large jump in message reach from a “nearby crowd” to millions with the introduction of something as fabulous as the internet. Also, Newton included that “we tend to use what we know to guess what happens,” but I would have liked to see more factual evidence to back up his “guesses.” I can’t be a total critic because much of what he said is true; for instance, it is true that “every american generation has grown up with a different form of media on the rise.” With this “constantly changing” media, who’s to say we won’t live a future that includes electronic minds, robots of some sorts. After seeing slides on Star-Trek inventions that became realities, Newton’s notion of the future, “Think crazy. Not the out-of-the-box crazy, but the out-of-this-planet crazy” don’t seem too crazy. But this “enlightened” era near the beginning of the next century? All I can say is thank goodness I won’t be around for this World War 4.0 and an “Avatar”-like future; I don’t look good in blue anyway.

  59. Today’s Must See Monday discussion was led by, Eric Newton, Senior Advisor to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. This discussion was centered on the development of media throughout the ages and how it has made such a profound impact in today’s world of journalism and mass communications. Throughout the lecture, Mr. Newton made it very clear about what communications will be like within the next 100 years. He controlled his theories on 4 main principles consisting of 1. Profoundly new ages of digital communications, 2.Science fiction bridging history and philosophy, 3. Undiscovered patterns in the history of news, and 4. People in their 20’s play key role in inventing news media. With these 4 principles, it has been predicted that within time the digital age will expand from what it is now to something so much more profound such as the “Hyper Media” generation. In this generation, media will be more courageous and more science fictional, ultimately leading to World War 4.0. This Must See Monday was a great explanation of how media in the digital age develops, and what we can expect t happen within the future of Journalism.

  60. Must See Monday went into the depths of digital media entrepreneurship, and the projects that ASU students have completed. Dan Gillmor and CJ Cornell introduced the concept and four different projects that students have produced, and all proved that many changes to life are possible with new media. Why digital media, and the Cronkite school? This is my favorite topic that was introduced. Cornell talked about how he we are in the second age of digital media innovation, the first was all technology, and now it’s in our hands to change the use and content on in new media. If you look at the first half of the innovation, new tech companies like Yahoo, Google, Apple, and Microsoft have all made major profits with the internet. Things such as a search engine, which seems so simple to us now, changed the way the human race can get information. Now it’s our chance to not only benefit financially as innovative journalists, but help change how people get information and change the world for the better. The four projects introduced show how diverse our projects can be. Anything from community service to information about the light rail community can be used as a focus for a project. Once again, the magic thing about this is that by helping people get news and information these projects also have the chance to be highly profitable. This proves that there are great ways to make money, and that great journalism is adaptable. Must See Monday really implemented the idea to me that the Cronkite School is on to something by giving students the teaching and funding through the Knight Center for Digital Media Entrepreneurship to make both money and a difference.

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  62. behandling schreef:

    Another great event hosted by the DU Alumni Association. Very organized, fun and great food!

  63. helse schreef:

    In today’s Must See Monday, Eric Newton definitely captured my attention. Mr. Newton’s points and analysis of the past make perfect sense-because it is obvious when we look back. However, he brought up an excellent point about the future. If we only imagine what falls in line with the present then it is not innovation. In his analysis, Eric Newton presented a few timeless truths. The most inspiring and encouraging thing was hearing him say “ People in their 20s play a key role in developing new media… always have.” We do not have to wait to start thinking of new things, in fact, we should not wait at all. We have so many tools at our disposal. At the very least, we can start blogging and using social media. However, we also have the support of student organizations and programs. This is the time for change. Mr. Newton made another excellent point when he said, “ All the things you do now become exponentially more important as technology becomes exponentially larger.” It will become increasingly easier for people to abuse the news through technology which will create a larger demand for those who uphold journalistic values. It will also become more difficult to keep the audience interested, which will challenge journalists to be the very best and most creative. We’re the pioneers of the future.

  64. helse schreef:

    “It’s definitely crazy, so it might happen.” – Eric NewtonI guess I sat down in the First Amendment Forum tonight without any expectations. I really hadn’t put any insight into the title of tonight’s Must See Monday, but Eric Newton’s presentation definitely sticks with me as I write this and will probably define a large part of my life whether I like it or not. There isn’t really a way to confirm that anything he spoke about tonight will definitely happen, but we’ve all thought about it from time to time. Some of the revolutionary ideas in his presentation were scarier then others (i.e. artificial intelligent gaining self-awareness) and others were down right exciting. But maybe it’s because I can’t possibly imagine so much change occurring in such little time. And then I stop to remind myself that change of that magnitude occurs constantly, and that is how we’ve even made it to the Digital Age we live in today. The predictions that have been made seem silly out of context, but it really might happen. I just hope my grandchildren survive whatever Terminator apocalypse happens in the next 100 years.

  65. sykdommer schreef:

    For the Must See Monday Mr. Merina and Ms. Sullivan spoke to us about dealing with communities in crisis ethically. I found it pretty interesting that both of their first experiences (the Stockton shooting and LA race riots) were with major events. They made so pretty good points about interviewing methods like connecting with the person before conducting the interview. Something as simple as saying “sorry for your loss” can go a long way. Another tip that was given was simply try using language that the locals are familiar with. Mr. Merina used “up the bayou”, “down the bayou” etc. This small attempt to connect with the person being interviewed can open a person up. The final message was to not get too involved with everything in the media because there is a lot of death and negative stories and that can really make a person sad if they focus too much on it. Stay informed, but don’t obsess over stories. I think their advice was really important and useful. I liked the interview tips the most.

  66. medisiner schreef:

    Very much enjoyed your discussion tonight of the current presidential race between Obama and Romney in Manchester…Please add me to your blog list…Thanks

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  68. This evening in the First Amendment Forum, Eric Newton brought a very intriguing topic to the table. With the uncertainty of the future of journalism and its rapid progression in the digital age, it is hard to not wonder what the future holds. In front of one of the largest crowds of this year’s Must See Monday series, Mr. Newton explained his theory on how technology and journalism will progress into the year 2110. With history showing the exponential growth of forms of communication, it is only logical to think technology will keep progressing and bring new mediums of journalism to our society. Newton stated, “Today, we are just scratching the surface of the digital age.” He believes that science fiction is a great predictor of what the future holds. Today’s technologies, such as Skype and cell phones, were depicted on television many years before they were actually invented. Newton predicts that there will be a World War 3.0 (cyber war) and also World War 4.0 (man vs. machine). He also discussed his prediction that between 2090-2110 we will have “omni media” which includes thought projection and telepathy. These are all very wild guesses, but he stated that you must think in a crazy way in order to make great advances.

  69. Tonight’s Must See Monday was with Eric Newton, the senior adviser to the president of the Knight Foundation, and he spoke about the history and future of journalism. Newton spoke about the history of journalism and how it has developed over time, starting with Thomas Paine’s pamphlets, up until the technology we have in media today. The digital world has been changing so quickly, and it is crazy to think about how much more will change in the future. I thought it was really interesting how shows have predicted and influenced future technology, such as Skype in The Jetsons, and the cell phone in Star Trek. Newton spoke about how different generations have grown up with different forms of media, and it made me wonder how different and even more advanced the technology of future generations will be. He told us that in order to progress, we must watch more science fiction and think of crazy ideas. Overall, I thought this Must See Monday was very interesting, and it gave me a new perspective on journalism and our future.

  70. Eric Newton’s Must See Monday presentation on the future of journalism was very interesting and very important. Newton took us through the history of journalism from 1767 through 2110. He discussed the field from its pamphlet beginnings all the way through its present state of mobile and social media. He then went on to discuss future ideas of intelligent, hybrid, hyper, and omni media. He related all the different types of technology and world events that shape each media generation, pointing out that about every eighty years there is a crisis and awakening that generates a new generation of media. Newton emphasized how journalists must engage in technology and also understand that today’s technology is only the very surface of the digital age as a whole. And with new technology comes new ways to do things and new rules, therefore, Newton encourages that we rewrite the codes of ethics. Newton’s other main point was that the future is the product of crazy thinking. He gave many examples of how current technologies are the product of science fiction writers from years ago. We cannot think based on what we currently know, for this is assuming time is linear when it is in fact multi-dimensional. So in closing, Eric Newton asks us to “think crazy, off-the-planet crazy” and embrace the ever-changing world of journalism for the better.

  71. Fashion week schreef:

    According to Eric Newton of the Knight Foundation, my grandchildren will have computers attached to their brains. No, Newton doesn’t have a crystal ball—he has a formula of predicting the future of media based on patterns of communication in the past, a thorough investigation of media as it is today, and even by taking some inspiration from science fiction (he presented three modern technologies, Skype, cell phones and the iPad, and showed us how they were “predicted” by science fiction almost half a century ago in “The Jetsons,” “Star Trek” and 2001: A Space Odyssey, respectively). The underlying theme of the entire Must See Monday was the fact that the future is “crazy.” Although Newton is understandably proud of his formula, it really could just as kooky as Harold Camping’s rapture prediction earlier this year. Newton suggested that students prepare themselves by learning to perform in the future that has been/is being predicted, while also being flexible to a random turn-of-events.

  72. Fashion shows schreef:

    “A History of Future News: What 1767 Tells Us About 2110” with Eric Newton, Senior Advisor to the President of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation This was probably the most intriguing Must See Monday I’ve been to by far: it was very unique, and the theories speculated in this presentation are quite frightening to think about. In this presentation, Mr. Newton had talked about the exponential growth of technology, and how that will affect the way we pursue information and the way we work as Journalists. He talked about how much Journalism has changed in the last ten years alone, and how interconnected the world is, especially with the use of cell phones. He also mentioned how technology would take off from here: soon, technology will not just be a companion of ours, but it will develop to be a part of us. He compared this and other development to the things seen in SciFi movies, and how we already see technology from those movies used in our lives today (like Arthur C. Clarke’s “The Wireless World”, whose work included a space shuttle in it before even Sputnik was launched). Mr. Newton said to keep an eye on Science Fiction, as it may hold many ideas we will see in the future, like cyborgs and such. Personally, I believe not that SciFi predicts what our future has in store for us technology wise, but gives a challenge for inventors, to strive and make fiction into reality. If they continue to do this and continue to push the world forward in technology, I wonder what that means for the future of Journalists. Would our occupation be needed? Will the average person with these new technologies ( in the future) take on the position of Journalist, thus no longer making it an occupation? I suppose that we can only wait and find out.

  73. Fashion week schreef:

    Eric Knewton is a Senior Adviser to the president of the John S and James L. Knight Foundation. He explains that no one can tell the turn out of the digital age, science fiction equals big influence, each American generation come of age as a different news medium is rising, and people in the 20’s play a key role. We predict the future based on what we know. Eric tells us that every 80 years a crisis and a great awakening known as the light bulb, telephone, and film. He explains that the future is going to play a big role in the media. Also how there is going to be a World War 4.0 humans against non-humans. He is basically predicting the future of technology and what our world is going to become. For example, in the years 2027-2047 intelligence medias generation: visionary, cloud smart grids, robotics, and artificial intelligence. So all media will be smart, news bots, and universal data. Technology is taking over more and more every day.

  74. Eric Newton, the senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, sat down with his audience, which included many students of the Cronkite school, to discuss the future of news. His predictions of the future baffled many in the crowd but I was skeptical to believe in such fairytales. He talked about futuristic gadgets and things that would most likely be associated with Science Fiction movies, which ironically is what he alluded to several times, including popular movies and shows such as the Matrix, Star Trek, and I-Robot. But I was too smart to believe these things. After all, I AM a Cronkite student. As he continued to talk, however; I was left wondering whether these things were feasible, especially when he got to the gloomier portion of his speech. He talked about two possible world wars, both of which could happen in our life times. I was left fascinated thinking about the possible destruction of the world as we know it, but the creation of a world that we have yet to know. The possibilities for Journalism in the future is infinite. There is no limit to what we might do.

  75. This week’s Must See Monday speakers discussed, enlightened and showcased work done in the Knight Center for Digital Media Entrepreneurship. Four students presented their projects that were sound not just in technology but in concept as well. From a service that gives geographic information (including things to do, restaurants, and other local businesses) around city light rail stops to a service that allows you to digitally access short stories on the go, all of the projects were rooted in the students’ passions but were executed through advanced technologies. But these ‘projects’ are more than just projects. They are business ideas—start-ups—that could shape the careers for any one of these four individuals. They are services that could serve communities. They are entities that these students felt were lacking in current society. CJ Cornell, appropriately titled entrepreneur-in- resident with the Knight Center, pointed out that these students represent the new kind of entrepreneurs; those that he argues will dominate the second half of the digital media age. He said the technologies, though constantly undergoing improvements, are in place and now it is up to the content providers to use these technologies to convey compelling, poignant information to the wide audience that these mediums draw. Cornell spoke about entrepreneurship with fervor—a fervor that can sometimes be lacking from journalists in this transitional time. Entrepreneurship to me was chasing steadfastly after a dream no matter how practical it may be (maybe that is the starving artist in me rather than the entrepreneur). Cornell conceded however that it isn’t entirely about living your dream. He said it’s more about having a vision, taking risks, and having ownership of your product. You have to constantly be an innovator in one area or another. Together these produce not only a paycheck for you but a paycheck for 100s of people. In whatever path my career ends up taking, I know these words will stick with me and remind me to utilize my creativity, think innovatively and take risks, equally unafraid of failing as I am unafraid of succeeding.

  76. Dan Gilmor and CJ Cornell were this weeks Must See Monday’s Speakers, and they spoke entirely about the age of digital journalism that we are in today and how entrepreneurship is and will continue to be involved in the growth of the new journalism. Gilmor spoke about four different students associated with the Cronkite school who dove into the field of entrepreneurship. They spoke about how these ideas are not only tools that give the public what they want and need to know, but they are also great startup business ideas and could potentially result in these students careers for years to come. The four websites the student introduce were not only beneficial to the community, they also gave people exactly what they want, wether it be on the light rail or a more brad range of news instantly. I was thoroughly impressed how these students are virtually all the same age as me and they truly have these amazing ideas that i believe will all add to the world. I believe that all of these students will be able to benefit with full time careers out of their own enterprises. Cornell encouraged student about the opportunities of entrepreneurship in journalism and spoke about the business that will be created and how this will essentially be part of the next wave of technology and journalism in the digital age. She then took questions and thanked the four participants. I thought this had to be one of my favorite presentations largely due to the fact that all of these students were exactly like me. They have been given the same tools as me and have utilized them to the max. It has given me some inspiration to actually consider thinking about creating my own venture in the new digital age of journalism.

  77. If these stromatolites survived in such a cold, is there a chance we will find something similar under the icecaps of moon Europa?

  78. coach training schreef:

    This Monday, Eric Newton came and visited to talk to us Cronkite students. Newton is the Senior Advisor to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight foundation and the creator of the Newseum in Washington D.C. This week’s topic was “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 tells us about 2100”. He said that science fiction writers go with their imagination, so they bridge fiction to reality better than the experts. For example, The Jetsons, dating from the 1960’s, had a device similar to the ever-so-popular Skype. Also, he said that every American generation grows up with a different sense of media, meaning that each generation since the Revolutionary War comes of age as a different news medium rises. The digital age is the new age, starting from 1991 and continues through today. In the future, Newton predicts that every public information material will be public, and available all the time. The next age after that will have media implants, with enhanced human capacity. I was intrigued through the discussion and his predictions, and also terrified of the World War 3.0. I am going to try and keep my notes so that one day, when I get older and the time periods he discussed become the current time, I can look back and see if his predictions were accurate.

  79. For the Must See Monday Mr. Merina and Ms. Sullivan spoke to us about dealing with communities in crisis ethically. I found it pretty interesting that both of their first experiences (the Stockton shooting and LA race riots) were with major events. They made so pretty good points about interviewing methods like connecting with the person before conducting the interview. Something as simple as saying “sorry for your loss” can go a long way. Another tip that was given was simply try using language that the locals are familiar with. Mr. Merina used “up the bayou”, “down the bayou” etc. This small attempt to connect with the person being interviewed can open a person up. The final message was to not get too involved with everything in the media because there is a lot of death and negative stories and that can really make a person sad if they focus too much on it. Stay informed, but don’t obsess over stories. I think their advice was really important and useful. I liked the interview tips the most.

  80. Before Eric Newton started talking, I had no idea what the title “what 1767 tells us about 2100” meant. I found his timelines of the different eras very interesting and I he did a great job explaining all the different evolutions of journalism and not only how much it has grown but also how much it will continue to grow. I found his correlations between the wars particularly fascinating and the World War 3.0 will definitely be something to look out for. I also enjoyed his advice for future journalists; he was able to put a serious and humorous twist on each of his points. My favorite part however was when he talked about we always say journalism right now changing more than ever when in fact it has been changing constantly ever since 1767. There will always be something that one generation never had to worry about or something that one generation missed because new methods are always being invented and changed.

  81. coach training schreef:

    Eric Newton really delved inside of the minds of the future journalists in the room, including myself. Early on in his talk and near the end as well, he told us how the new digital age as well as the future upcoming generations of journalism and technology is unknown; no one knows how exactly it will come out. The idea of singularity brings this up and how it consists of predictions that the future is always radically different. From there is showed us the past generations and what medium was the main use during that time. I enjoyed the gradual evolution he showed us, especially how he compared them to many futuristic movies that have been made somewhat recently. Then his visionary, hybrid, courageous and enlightened generations made people start thinking. Although most of us wouldn’t be alive for all of these generations, he showed us the potential of journalism and technology. He displayed to us, using these examples, that journalists have a big influence in the world and it is definitely going change people’s lives in the future.

  82. For tonight’s Must See Monday, we had the opportunity to hear what Eric Newton, senior advisor to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, speak about, “A History of the Future of News.” Newton said that journalism is, “a fair and intellectual search for the truth.” He spoke about how we are living in a digital age of media and explained to us communication’s exponential rise. Currently, we are in a progressive news medium, and the age is still rising. Newton said that science fiction writers use their imagination to predict what things and places will look like in the future. A few interesting examples were that the man who invented the cell phone got the idea from the phone used in the movie Star Trek, also in The Jetson’s the first version of skype was introduced. Newton explained that time comes in cycles. Depressions and crisis happens about every 80 years. The cycle of 80 years seems to persist even as information is exploding. Newton said that print media will die and most newspapers will be gone by the year 2047. By 2068, there will most likely be a machine awakening where implants of information could be placed within one’s brain. By 2099, information will be able to be downloaded into one’s brain and even after one dies, the information on the implants lives on. Newton said by this time news will simply turn into whatever we want to know and whatever we can download into our brains. Also, is the 80 year cycle continues, by 2110, World War 4 will occur. World War 4, from Newton’s standpoint will be not country against country, but more like the whole world of human beings against some type of non-human robot or creature. I found this information to be a far reach, but it definitely held my attention because science fiction shows all of these events happening mostly through movies, but it is all up in the air as to what could happen next. From a journalist’s standpoint, I am starting to believe that anything is possible.

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  87. Tonight’s Must See Monday featured Eric Newton, founder of newseum.org and senior advisor to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Eric’s Talk, “The History of the Future of News: What 1767 tells us about 2110,” was very inspirational. I see why there was so much hype about this. Eric Newton talked about his career is the past decade. He talked about how being a managing editor of The Oakland Tribune was like. I also enjoyed hearing about how he was founding director of Newseum. My favorite part was seeing how connected the past history of journalism is to the future. In JMC 110, we have heard lecture after lecture about the history of journalism. To be honest the book is quite boring, but it is nice to know that the book has a purpose. He talked about how far we have come over the course of eighty years and how much journalism has changed the world. The future is limitless. The only question is where do we go next? Do we go to World War 3? That is quite possible. “Today we are just scratching the surface of the digital age.

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    At the Last Must See Monday the topic was “Communities in Crisis: Ethical Considerations for Journalist.” The focus of the interview was toward Victor Merina, senior correspondent and special projects editor from Reznet and Ina Jaffe, national desk correspondent from NPR West. The pair gave the audience valuable information on how to cover breaking news. A lot of what Merina and Jaffe discussed was something that I find very valuable to every journalist. From listening to their feedback I learned that it’s important to never lose sight of your job, which is telling a story and that it’s important to not make a traumatic situation worse by simply asking the wrong things at the wrong time. When it comes to getting sources from the scene, it’s important for us as journalists to express humanity to what they have been through and staying professional. I’ve learned that when covering a breaking news story it’s important to give your sources background information to put them more at ease, and be willing to let them ask some questions once.

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    I thought it was interesting how this week’s Must See Monday was planned before the Tucson shooting occurred because the topic, “Communities in Crisis: Ethical Consideration for Journalists” is a fitting issue to discuss after such a tragedy. Nevertheless, the Must See Monday gave helpful insight on how to truthfully report and cover a crisis while remaining ethically sound that I think every journalist ought to know.Ina Jaffe from NPR West explained how she covered her first breaking news story, the Cleveland School shooting. One day, a man referred to as a loner showed up on the schoolyard and just started shooting around. Many children, mainly Southeast Asian refugees, were killed or wounded. Jaffe’s story was on how the school was patching up bullet holes, cleaning the schoolyard and planning to open the next day. Jaffe was horrified to have to stick a mic in the face of a child who just saw their classmates shot, but her editor said to not interview children. Instead, Jaffe reported on the scene and talked to people who were not children. Although children were the main ones who witnessed the event, interviewing them was crossing that ethical line that could have made the situation worse and more tragic. Children may have given insight into the horrific occurrence, but interviewing such young children would have brought more suffering.Based on his own experience covering tragedies and communities in crisis, Victor Merina from Reznet talked about the importance of observing your surroundings in addition to conducting interviews. When journalists are looking for that golden quote, they often fail at other things such as observing the location and people for the story. Observation can add much richness to stories and help the audience get a better picture of the scene. Merina also mentioned the importance of spending time with the people you interview to get a better understanding for the story. By taking that extra time to understand and make your sources feel comfortable, you build their trust and are more likely to gain helpful information for your article.I feel that this week’s Must See Monday gave valuable information and tips that many Cronkite students may need to use in their futures as journalists.

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  114. This Must See Monday was unlike any other not only in its subject matter, but also in its anticipation. Faculty and students from all grade levels flooded the First Amendment Forum to listen in attentive curiosity about the future of journalism. It was an amazing feeling being in the forum last night, the heartbeat of Cronkite beating as one as we collectively came to grips with the future being in our hands. It was captivating to look around the room thinking, “The next person to change the media world may be right here is this room.” It was exciting knowing that the future is in our creative hands to take hold of. It is a freedom that isn’t given but rather taken advantage of. The ball is in our court. It’s time to decide if we want to conquer the challenges that lie ahead and play the most uncertain game. It’s a gamble only worthy of the most courageous of journalists. It’s time for the Cronkite School to change the world.

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  117. While sitting in tonight’s Must See Monday lecture with Eric Newton, I started to ponder about what news media will look like one year from now. Or even five, ten years from now. It is so amazing to see how everyday people can make an impact on the whole world by just one little idea that gets branched off of many other things. I believe journalists are what hold the world together. Only 20 years ago is when the new online digital age began. Image what the 5 billion people in the world with cell phones would be like today if it were not for the writer of Star Trek who gave the man the idea to create the cell phone. Or think about the science fiction writer about the Jetsons, without him we wouldn’t have Skype. Just 5 years ago, college students could travel across the country and not get to see family or friends at all, but now with Skype our digital age is amazing. The world is advancing because of journalists and I am excited to see where we are heading. At the beginning of his speech, Mr. Newton said that people in their 20’s play key roles in inventing news media. With me being close to that age, I am extremely excited to contribute to the new advances in the world through my usage of journalism.

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    Tonight’s “Must See Monday” was one of the best turnouts this semester. Eric Newton, the senior advisor to the president of Knight Foundation, was the guest speaker. Dean Callahan introduced Mr. Newton by acknowledging the amount of dedication and contribution he has brought to journalism. One of Newton’s key points was the transformation of journalism of throughout the years. He described various types of journalism in past and future generations. Every generation has experienced a distinctive form of media as they have grown up. Eric Newton portrayed the current generation as the social and mobile media period. I couldn’t agree more of course. As Newton continued with how he foresees the future with journalism, he used the metaphor of a cyclone. It is a field that turns and turns, but is constantly moving forward. The future, according to Eric Newton and other journalists, will be filled with technology beyond our wildest imaginations. We will soon see a world consumed with robots and an imminent cyberspace war. Whatever is to come will come. It is important that journalists are open to diversity and the change of technology, but they must stay focused on the issues that are at-hand today. In the words of Eric Newton, “Play your historic role, without fear or favor, while balancing the changes of society.”

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    “New Tools Make New Rules” Eric Newton’s discussion on the future and past of media sheds light on a pattern of social media development that can be overlooked by most. He started by focusing on the very start of news itself, back to when the grunts and pointing of cavemen are all we can assume were ways of alerting other. Newton then works his way through each media advancement since then, until present, and then on through the future. Shown on a table in increments of 20 years, he demonstrates the steady growth of societies technological advance and the shocking repetition of events that have occurred multiple times throughout history. It is with these past reoccurring events that he feels it is perfectly possible to predict the world’s betterment of media in years to come. The timeline table, displayed behind him not only shows our telecommunication improvements, but also presents a somewhat fixed order of events. For it seems that it only takes a given amount of time after one occurrence that the same is bound to happen again, signifying roughly 80 years we experience a great awakening. But it doesn’t just take a table to foreshadow the advancements ahead of our time; it requires no more than watching the newest science fiction movie. But how can something so mainstream allow the majority of people the insight to the future? It is because, as explained by Newton, science fictionists are more accurately bridging history and predicting technological outbreaks. The inventor of the cell phone for example says he got the idea solely based on, at the time ridiculous, prop used in “Star Trek.” So what exactly is suspected to develop? Newton states, based on an emulating history, he feels the progress ahead will end all print media, perhaps another world war and even more portability and personal tech devices that will be capable of things more than imaginable. However, despite the obvious patterns, many people say that nothing advanced historically during their generation of growing up. Though sometimes it seems mediocre or expected of technology to be as advanced it is, think about what they thought was “advanced” 20 years ago.

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    Eric Newton mentioned we all have to “think crazy—off the planet crazy” during his speech titled “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 tells us about 2110.” Newton definitely sounded crazy as he described stages of future media as Intelligent, Bio, Hyper and Omni. The next one hundred years are supposed to contain artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, media implants, cranial downloads and telekinesis, according to Newton. All this will lead to World War 4.0, humans against non-humans. Newton said 2011 is “just scratching the surface of the digital age.” Personally, I’m fine with the surface. I think where the world is with the media is decent. Newton predicted what new technology will surface based off science fiction, but why is that okay? He concluded with a war. Last time I checked, wars were not something to be looking forward to. Plus, every sci-fi novel or movie that has robots or advanced technology does not end well for humans. Shouldn’t we be trying to avoid that technological extreme? I do think technology has helped society as a whole, and I understand that it will continue to advance throughout the years. However, I feel like a line needs to be drawn or extreme precautions should be taken before experimenting with more media machines.

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  125. Tonight I listened to Eric Newton give his presentation on “A history of the future of news: What 1767 tells us about 2110” Eric Newton is a seasoned and hardworking journalist and is currently the senior advisor to the president of the Knight foundation. During his presentation he outlined some various points including stating that no one knows how the future will turn out, science fiction is doing the best job of depicting the future, and every generation grows up with a different common type of media. Newton talked a lot about the Evolution of Human Communication. Starting with the visual age during 1-2M BC and going all the way through to the 90’s and today with the digital age. Newton noted that communications is on an exponential rise and that we predict the future based on what we know now. He also cited some obvious examples of science fiction depicting the future with Skype on the Jetsons, cell phones on Star Trek, and the iPad on A Space Odyssey. Newton opened my eyes to the fact that each generation comes of age as a different news medium is rising with awakenings and crises occurring every 80 years. This timeline is extremely consistent. I loved his thoughts on the future of digital media and it opened my eyes to many things that were slightly obvious yet I did not realize. I really appreciated this presentation.

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    ?Eric Newton, Senior Advisor to the President of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, led the Must See Mondays lecture, “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 Tells Us About 2110,” and made some dubious points about the gradual change in media and journalism. He began the chronological tour of the ever-changing media world with verbal communication, then upgraded to the pamphlet; penny press; the telegraph until we  arrived to where we are today—helplessly occupied by our cell phones, iPads, televisions and computers. He touched on how early popular TV programs helped the creation of many of the devices we have the opportunity of using. The Flintstones had its version of Skype, where its characters were able to communicate via video, and Star Trek unveiled the planet’s first cell phone. These out-of-the-box inventions backed the words of Newton, when he said we must think “crazy and out of this world,” when moving forward in this digital age.

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    The weeks Must See Monday is quite special. It features the “History of the Future of News: What 1767 Tells us About 2110”. The intro was done by Dean Callahan. And then Senior Advisor to the Knight Foundation Eric Newton started going over how things from the past influence the future. For instance, the T.V. show “The Jetsens” came up with the idea of skype long before it was real. Newton then went to look at cycles throughout history such as World War 3.0 that is possibly soon to begin. “Cyber space is an arena for war”, Newton stated. If the cycles in history continue then we can expect technology to grow into something unimaginable. Our future could hold things such as having “newsbots” or having real conversations with your computer. With this new influx of technology old media will be sure to fall away into the past. “What’s next?”, Newton asked? The answer is bio media with augmented reality, media implants and nanotechnology. Newton continues to explain that 80 years from World War 3.0 there will be a World War 4.0 of humans v. a nonhuman entity. “Today we’re just scratching the surface of the digital age”. This quote is so true. Our future is rapidly approaching and it is up to us to shape it. Newton continued to explain what a journalist should do with this rapidly growing field. Journalists used to be able to just write on paper with ink and send it out to the world. Now we type up our information and send it out or broadcast our information to thousands over the television. So what is a journalist to do? Keep up with the times in this sea of technology. “Happy Sailing”.

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    Eric Newton’s lecture today reminded me of George Orwell’s book called “1984” which was written in the late 1940’s. In this book Orwell draws up a story about a man and his life living in the year 1984. In this man’s life there are cameras everywhere and people are always being watched by the government etc. Just the fact that Orwell’s prediction were just a little off, his predictions were still interesting to read. This lecture really opened my eyes about just how fast technology is growing. The one quote that really caught my attention tonight was when he said, “New tools make new rules.” Though simple and straight to the point, this stretched my brain out more than I expected it to. “New tools make new rules,” to me this means the further technology grows the more different our society will grow. Generations are all growing with such dramatic change from the one before it. When he talked about future generations of technology (if the patterns continue) it really all made sense to me. Although every future technology he said sounded impossible to me… cellphones sounded impossible just 50 years ago. I’m excited to see how much of his predictions really do come true. I wouldn’t be surprised if they all did!

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    Dan Gilmor and CJ Cornell were this weeks Must See Monday’s Speakers, and they spoke entirely about the age of digital journalism that we are in today and how entrepreneurship is and will continue to be involved in the growth of the new journalism. Gilmor spoke about four different students associated with the Cronkite school who dove into the field of entrepreneurship. They spoke about how these ideas are not only tools that give the public what they want and need to know, but they are also great startup business ideas and could potentially result in these students careers for years to come. The four websites the student introduce were not only beneficial to the community, they also gave people exactly what they want, wether it be on the light rail or a more brad range of news instantly. I was thoroughly impressed how these students are virtually all the same age as me and they truly have these amazing ideas that i believe will all add to the world. I believe that all of these students will be able to benefit with full time careers out of their own enterprises. Cornell encouraged student about the opportunities of entrepreneurship in journalism and spoke about the business that will be created and how this will essentially be part of the next wave of technology and journalism in the digital age. She then took questions and thanked the four participants. I thought this had to be one of my favorite presentations largely due to the fact that all of these students were exactly like me. They have been given the same tools as me and have utilized them to the max. It has given me some inspiration to actually consider thinking about creating my own venture in the new digital age of journalism.

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    Tonight’s Must See Monday was one that I have been looking forward to for a while. Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, was our guest speaker who spoke to all of us about the future of journalism as it may look today. This was also very important for me to attend due to the fact that it is the last posting for Cronkite Conversations that will be accepted for the Christiane Amanpour luncheon.“Do you have any idea how lucky you are?” Newton began the night. He asked us this to get us to think about our future at the Cronkite School. His first point was about the digital age and the unexpected outcomes.We time traveled through time to explore the four ages of human communication. The categories included visual, language, mass media and digital. These began from 1-2 m BC all the way up through 1991 AD.There were approximately 1 million years of visual media until verbal media came along and skyrocketed. This interested me because I knew this all along, I just never thought about it in this context which makes the topic sound huge.Newton showed us some different journalism perspectives that showed how fiction writers dream up things that people can’t seem to calculate. The first principal is to think crazy and unconventional to find something new and ground breaking. We talk about this a lot in journalism to get students to think of ways to be innovative and get entrepreneurship visions started.I found one of his slides very interesting which showed how each generation is raised and comes of age as a different news medium is rising. He stated that about 80 years there has been a crisis and a great awakening. This reminds me of some of Aaron Browns Must See Monday lectures in which he tried to express that America had not recovered over time due to 9/11.I never thought I would visualize and experience so many different patterns over time in which media and journalism evolved before our eyes. I have known that we are in a changing generation that accesses more technologies than in the past which shows American progress. I don’t think I ever would have seen how large this topic is had I not attended this amazing Must See Monday with Eric Newton.

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    This week’s “Must See Monday” (October 14, 2011) featured Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Newton’s presentation focused on the path of technology and its effect on news and other media outlets, specifically the social progress of “crisis” to “awakening”.By “crisis”, Newton was referring to the idea of a national or global event that had immediate negative impact on society, such as World War II. And each “crisis” occurs roughly every eighty years or so and leads to the eventual “awakening”. The “awakening” refers to the period when the culture has a major revitalization, such as the Renaissance or the Great Awakening. Newton also went on to say that if such a pattern persists into the future that society will eventually advance itself into extinction through “World War 4”, a war between humans and non-humans (machines, the environment, etc.).All in all, Newton’s presentation was awe-inspiring and a truly fantastic perception on the future of our society and journalism in the long run.

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    Eric Newton’s presentation on the history and future of journalism was surprisingly interesting. In it, he painted a stark picture of not only the future of journalism, but also the future of the world and how it relates to the journalistic profession.Newton listed the history of journalism, as well as the theory that a new brand of media evolves with every passing generation. From the pamphlet age to our current digital media juggernaut of an existence, one can definitely see the cyclical nature of journalistic evolution. But Newton didn’t simply stop at the current age. Instead, using predictions from “The Singularity is Near” and similar books, he applied the technological outlook to journalism. With the advent of new robotic organisms and faster, more instant global dissemination, the future speed and reach of news will only expand.However, I believe the human element will fall by the wayside in the relatively new future. While the ability to deliver the news will speed up, the same can be said of how humans wish to receive the news. Long drawn out explanations will no longer be desired. They barely are now. Journalists role will decrease. People will want the information, and at most they will look to experts for analysis.

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    Looking at a picture of 1999 New York, it is hard to imagine how someone would ever believe this picture’s futuristic qualities would be evident eleven years ago, let alone today. Eric Newton intrigues the crowd by posing the question “what went wrong in this picture?” Overall it was many things that contributed to the photo’s unnatural characteristics. These traits are: multi-time, science fiction writers, books and TV shows/movies. All of these implements allow us the knowledge of what the future has in store for media. Noticing trends, like Great Awakenings happening every eighty years, enhances the accuracy of the predictions that can take place. It is important for us journalist majors to be aware of what the future has in stake. As Newton said “we must focus on not what has been invented, but how the things exponentially grew.” Eric Newton’s presentation was very educational and interesting—especially when he showed a timeline of the things predicted to come all the way up to the year of 2100. Who would have thought there would be a WW4.0 of humans vs. robotics, like the iRobot? His conclusion was inspirational. It made me want to go out and “master a computer assisted reporting/design, watch a lot more science fiction, fool around with a new digital tool every day [and] rewrite [the] codes of ethics.”

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    This week’s Must See Monday presentation was about the Digital Media Entrepreneurship. CJ Cornell, the entrepreneur-in-residence, was the one who presented four “ventures” and their innovative media ideas. Before he handed the stage to the students, though, he told about how important certain things were. He said that ambiguity is important because you have to have a vision, you have to take risks, and take ownership, you have to be resourceful. He also said that your innovation has to be scalable. They really try to make people first and he said that the following were really important: 1) motivations 2) behavior 3) emotions. He also said that the future was important because of trends and opportunities. After this short speech, he handed the floor off to Elizabeth who was in charge of the Watch Tree. Elizabeth spoke so fast, she ran through her presentation and I really didn’t get to grasp what her innovation was about. It was something about how community service is made a lot more difficult to partake in than it should and Watch Tree allows people from everywhere to post community service activities and events. She made a good point about how these days if you want to volunteer, you have to rsvp three months in advance and it just isn’t practical. Also, you have to go through expensive medical tests and background checks, and it just gets crazy. She said with her innovation, it makes it easier for people to give back to the community who don’t have the ability to give a high level of commitment. I thought it was neat. The next person was Adam and he actually received the Knight Grant that funded $100,000 of his innovation project. What it is, is a website that gives relevant information to you when you are riding the lightrail. It follows you wherever you go. Say you start out on the transit in Phoenix and you are on your way to Tempe. When you are in Phoenix, the information you receive will be about Phoenix, but once you cross into Tempe, the information will become about Tempe. It allows people to share content.The person after this was Amanda Crawford, who with Andrew Gessell created the idea of Fictionado. Amanda is a journalism student and she thought of how cool it would be to have a website that made it easy for people to do reading on the go through their mobile devices. She said that if you see a poster on the lightrail or elsewhere, you can take a picture of a barcode on the poster with your iPhone or Droid phone and the short stories would just appear on your phone. The idea is still underway and I thought this was really neat. She said that “how we’re reading has changed” and she wants her website to be the “netflics for short stories.” The last person to go was Marius Ciociriam who, oddly enough, is a film major. As CJ Cornell said, he wanted to incorporate a lot of different students into the progam, not just limit it to journalism students. Marius is a perfect example of this attempt. He created Blimee and his idea is that new can be displayed on digital signage instead of a bunch of ads up on huge screens. He wants to be able to show local newspapers on the big screen and he is currently working with Advision Media. They provide the screens for Blimee news feeds. I thought this was really neat and I’m glad I went to the Must See Monday.

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    Tonight we had the opportunity to listen to Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. I found this Must See Monday very interesting because we can relate to it in many ways, especially because our lives revolve around technology and mass media now. I was interested to learn about the evolution and how the media rises through each generation. From the compromise generation, we were introduced to pamphlets. From the transcendental generation, we were introduced to Partisan weekly newspapers and so on. It was nice to see the progress of media outlined and it really helped to put in perspective how media changes throughout the years. Eric Newton also discussed science fiction and how writers go with their imagination. For example; moon travel, geostationary satellites which make the digital age possible, cell phones, and so on. I found Mr. Newton very interesting and intellectual; I enjoyed learning the history and seeing how media has changed over the years.

  148. In the words of Eric Newton, “we need to think off the planet crazy” in order to move forward into the future. It is almost scary how the movement of technology has evolved in such a short amount of time. When you really think about it cell phones and apple products of today have essentially taken over our world in a matter of a few decades. In a world where the consumer is always wanting more and the inventor can never make his or her invention “perfect” our technology will never stop evolving. So when do we begin to put limits on our evolution? Will monsters that were once a fragment of one’s imagination run our future society? I can only hope that our future generations will not succumb to the desires of wanting more. Although the latest technologies are what we see as a way of survival, I think that following the cycle of crisis and inventing such “off the planet crazy” technologies such as cranial downloads, media implants, and newsbots may be taking our constant progression a little too far. There will come a time when the cycle must be broken to keep our society well…a society.

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  150. Eric Newton brought up some very interesting and even startling points about the continuing evolution of media, journalism and technology. Newton made four distinct point that he used to define the transition of media through history: 1) That we are in a profound age of new communication –The Digital Age; 2) Science-fiction is acting as the bridge between old and new communications and media; 3) There are many undiscovered patterns within the history of news; 4) The youth –people in their twenties –play a huge role in the future of news, technology and media. These four points related to every stage of journalism that the world has experienced since 1767. It is amazing to look back at even just the evolution that took place in the span between the Baby-Boomer Age of glossy colored magazines, to the still-present Cyber Age of Mobil and social media. The startling part is that the progression does not stop in the Cyber Age; Newton conveyed the predictions of what the future of media and technology holds –and it can be frightening. The proposal that the stage of visionary media will end soon is very prevalent, but the notion of society developing into the courageous, hyper media stage and into enlightenment stage is a hard concept to grasp. The ideas are challenging to comprehend simply because they are almost too realistic. With the speed of the technological evolution all the predictions are very likely ideas and that is the scary part. World War 4.0 the war between humans and nonhumans was the final prediction of Newton’s lecture and it leaves behind the question of “What is to come in the future?” Eric Newton raised this question and now it is up to the generation –the age of the twenty-year olds –to decide the remaining path in this digital development.

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    We as journalist must prepare for World War 3.0 immediately! According to Eric Newton who spoke at this week’s Must See Monday, the first war between the non-human forms is imminent. The Digital War is looming, as our cyber armies are currently being built. And,” We are here, right in the middle of it all,” as machines will become self-aware. Back tracking to his opening, words, Newton stated points of our “History of the Future of News: What 1767 tells us about 2100.” One point was that every American generation grows up with a different form of media. We have come from the Age of Visual to our current Age of Digital. It continues to change as Hyper Media emerges and the machines create even more high tech machines at an exponential rate. We will eventually reach, Omi-Media. As I left the lecture with the fear of “I-Robot,” becoming reality in the near future, and of images of mass chaos of iPhones marching humans down the street, I also left with a sense of a mission. “People in their 20’s play key roles in inventing news media.” With that age not too far off, I will face up to that challenge that Newton has set up for us.

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    In this evening’s lecture, Mr. Eric Newton tickled the sci-fi nerd in everyone who attended; I suddenly have the urge to watch James Cameron’s Avatar, but I digress. Newton discussed of the advancement of technology and the media through which humans (and eventually robots) will communicate in a rational but creative way. Newton went through sixteen ages of American Journalism, four of which were hypotheses on the future of technology. The other twelve coincided with eras that I have studied in Principles and History of Journalism. The changes in technology coincide with the evolving traditions of journalism. Something that was not completely addressed in this lecture was the changing principles of journalism in the ages of nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, or telepathy. As in-depth as Newton went in the discussion of the evolution of technology, there was not much discussion in regards to how the on-going digital age will affect how the news is reported or written. It might just be up to us, the current students of journalism, to decide how things will be done in the future.

  155. At the Last Must See Monday the topic was “Communities in Crisis: Ethical Considerations for Journalist.” The focus of the interview was toward Victor Merina, senior correspondent and special projects editor from Reznet and Ina Jaffe, national desk correspondent from NPR West. The pair gave the audience valuable information on how to cover breaking news. A lot of what Merina and Jaffe discussed was something that I find very valuable to every journalist. From listening to their feedback I learned that it’s important to never lose sight of your job, which is telling a story and that it’s important to not make a traumatic situation worse by simply asking the wrong things at the wrong time. When it comes to getting sources from the scene, it’s important for us as journalists to express humanity to what they have been through and staying professional. I’ve learned that when covering a breaking news story it’s important to give your sources background information to put them more at ease, and be willing to let them ask some questions once.

  156. “It’s definitely crazy, so it might happen.” – Eric NewtonI guess I sat down in the First Amendment Forum tonight without any expectations. I really hadn’t put any insight into the title of tonight’s Must See Monday, but Eric Newton’s presentation definitely sticks with me as I write this and will probably define a large part of my life whether I like it or not. There isn’t really a way to confirm that anything he spoke about tonight will definitely happen, but we’ve all thought about it from time to time. Some of the revolutionary ideas in his presentation were scarier then others (i.e. artificial intelligent gaining self-awareness) and others were down right exciting. But maybe it’s because I can’t possibly imagine so much change occurring in such little time. And then I stop to remind myself that change of that magnitude occurs constantly, and that is how we’ve even made it to the Digital Age we live in today. The predictions that have been made seem silly out of context, but it really might happen. I just hope my grandchildren survive whatever Terminator apocalypse happens in the next 100 years.

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  160. When first entering journalism at this day and age all you hear about is how media is changing and how much technology is affecting it. When Eric Newton first started talking about entering the digital world, I never thought about how crazy some of the things are that we posses today. Such as cell phones that started out as a fantasy on the TV show “Star Trek”. When he put it in this perspective it almost intimidated and frightened me at the thought of what would happen in the future. But as the talk continued, I realized that as intimidating as these ideas may be, they also mean more outlets for creativity in journalism. As more and more information is being possible to be shared, and shared in different ways, I am beginning to realize that leaving my footprint on the journalism world may be as easy as simply writing this blog and posting it everywhere. Technology is changing, and whether we see it as progressing or not, it means that journalism is changing, and being more accessible and more creative, which I believe is always a good thing.

  161. I just attended the Must See Monday event featuring Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, discussing “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 Tells Us About 2110.” Newton gave a detailed summary about past journalistic experiences and models that have proved successful. As we advance into what is known as the “digital age,” people can see, hear, read and listen to the news at any time, Newton said. From the 1600s to the present, journalism has clearly advanced into a vastly technology-driven world. “Is this too much for 20-somethings to handle?” Newton asked. The answer to this question is debatable. At times, I feel overwhelmed with all of the different news and media that is constantly thrown into my face. Whether it is a big, graphic picture on a website or an obnoxious tweet on Twitter, I feel that I can never truly escape the media. Being a journalism student I appreciate how readily available the news is, but I would like choose how often I am exposed to that news. Do we look into the past to predict what the future holds? Newton feels that the answer could be yes. With the fast-paced technological developments made thus far, it seems only fitting that mind-reading robots and computers could be a possibility. Newton used various futuristic movies to demonstrate how ideas from the past were actually transformed into real inventions today. Newton used the famous Star Trek TV series as an example, stating that in the TV show characters used cellphone devices to communicate. Years later, the cellphone was created and later improved, allowing people to regularly check updates and read news articles in seconds. Newton stated that the inventor of the cellphone was actually inspired by the Star Trek devices in his creation of the cellphone. Newton also referenced the movie I, Robot, suggesting that perhaps robots and other inventions in films today could predict future technology developments. Newton emphasized that as technology progresses from past to present to future, how we consume the news will change as well. In the past, all people had were newspapers and now people can access any type of news at anytime from multiple devices. Could robots possibly be our future links to the news? In a seemingly digital world, it is easy to question the availability in the job market for journalists graduating college. However, Newton instilled a little confidence in the young journalist audience, stating that there will still be jobs in the future for journalists. Although most news is displayed on the Internet now, the job market will adapt to future news and media creations and outlets. Finding a successful career as a journalist in the future is simply a question of learning the new modes of communication, Newton said. I really enjoyed Newton’s presentation and I found it very informative!

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  163. Today’s Must See Monday really was a “must see!” Eric Newton,Senior adviser to the president of the John S and James L. Knight Foundation, really brought to attention the fact that media is ALWAYS changing. He referred to the current young generation as digital natives. We do not know a world without daily newspapers, though there was a day. Still today, communication is exponentially on the rise! The predictions that Newton made about the future were so incredibly interesting. First he made the prediction that starting around 2027, intelligent media would be the form of media on the rise; meaning nearly everyone would have “smart” devices with them at all times. Newton presumes that the Bio Media will be prevailing from 2048 to 2068 and people will begin to have media implants and will be able to communicate with others at all times. Following Bio Media is Hyper Media, and finally Enlightened media up until 2110. By then he believes that people will be able to communicate with the environment and have all of their surroundings respond as well. The whole time that Newton was leading up to his predictions about the future he said “No, we’re not crazy yet…” but now that he covered his ideas, things have certainly gone “crazy!” I think that it’s so interesting he has such specific ideas about what is going to take place in the future and when. As he concluded, there will always be a need for journalists. The true key is being engaged in the technology in order to move forward and provide truthful information to the people.

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  174. Tonight Eric Newton spoke to us about the future of Journalism and what technology in media will look like just before the 22nd century. He gave us a timeline that looked pretty interesting to me. Eric believes that communication is on the exponential rise and that we predict the future based on what we know. The future is always changing and there’s nothing we can do about it. It’s inevitable. Eric said something that I thought was pretty interesting. “Science fiction writers are better at predicting the future than the experts.” It’s sad, but true. Everything he was saying in his presentation was true. Like how every 80 years there has been a crisis or an awakening. He used examples like The Revolutionary War to The Civil War and then finally to World War II. Eric predicts that the next world war will be a cyber war. He believes its happening now. I thought his whole presentation was enlightening and really had me thinking into the future.

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  176. Four graduate students showcased their innovated digital media ventures Monday night at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications.The four ventures presented in partner with ASU’s Knight Center for Digital Media and Entrepreneurship were “The Watch Tree”, “City Circles”, “Fictionado”, and “Blimee”.The first people to the podium were CJ Cronell, the Knight Center director, and Dan Gillmor, a professor, who introduced the students and talked about the importance of entrepreneurship to create new ideas in a community.“As an entrepreneur you have to have a vision and ownership,” Cornell said. “You have to innovate in a particular area.”One of the projects that night that pertained specifically to citizens who ride the Metro light rail was “City Circles” by Adam Klawonn.“City Circles” is an innovated way for users of the light rail to receive mobile uploads on what types of activity is going on around at every stop, such as, job opportunities, local events, and daily news. “We’re creating content…and sharing content with people who live in neighborhoods around the rail,” Klawonn said.The Knight Center won the 2010 President’s innovation award from Arizona State University this year.

  177. With all the improvements in technology and furiously growing social media outlets, it can seem as though the world of journalism is changing more than ever. That, however, is not true at all. Eric Newton, Senior Advisor to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, reminded Cronkite students at tonight’s Must See Monday that our generation is not the first nor the only one to experience such rapid growth in media and technology. He explained that there is a pattern in history that shows a major crisis followed by an “awakening” approximately every 80 years. Looking back, every generation “grew up” with it’s own type of media: our grandparents grew up with the radio, our parents withe the TV, our generation has the internet, and the generations to come will have different ways of communication as well. As scary and unknown as the changes to come may be, Newton stated that it is “basic human need not just to know, but to tell,” so even though journalism is continuing to adapt to its current settings, it will always be around, just in a different way.

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    Reporting truthfully and accurately without further hurting victims during natural and man-made disasters was the theme of Must See Monday featuring Victory Merina from Reznet, and Ina Jaffe from NPR. The speakers covered how trauma isn’t always just for the victims of the disasters, it often can extend to the journalists covering wars, deaths and other disasters which increases the difficultly in covering the news right. Jaffe said her first breaking news event was a school shooting in 1989 in Los Angeles, in which the shooter killed 5-6 kids. “I covered the scene of them patching up the bullet holes so they could go to school the next day, but I was terrified of having to talk to children and stick a microphone in their face after this event,” Jaffe said. Jaffe said you cannot make it worse, that’s the bottom line do not make it worse for the people that are involved. Merina brought up covering the Rodney King case, he explained that covering the deaths resulting from the riots was the most challenging for the reporters. He said that he had to talk to someone who was open first before approaching the family as a whole, because they will allow the others to trust you. They said that trying to be humane as possible and showing respect helps all reporters trying to cover these stories. They also said that deadlines can’t affect our ability to get the full story, it’s a sign of respect to give the story the time it needs. The two said that it is troubling if you get this wrong as a human being, and increase the damage to the people dealing with sorrow. Respect for the victims was the theme of the night, as all cases they talked about demanded respect for the victims, the event, and the other people involved. Being able to connect to the people involved opened the door for Merina in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, because it allows for people to see that your not out to harm them. As a Cronkite student, I feel that we are blessed with the proper tools and training to allow us to cover these events right. We are required to take ethics, but also we learn how to report ‘old-fashioned,’ and more to get the best story not just the quick story. That training allows for us to be human beings as well as reporters.

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    Tonight’s Must See Monday was a mind-blowing talk on how things from the past help shape the future in the ways we invent and create new things. Newtons main argument was that historic ideas help people come up with new ideas and that technology will only keep progressing and just get more and more advanced. Some examples of this include how “Skype” was derived from the Jetson’s t.v. show, and the cell phone was used in Star Treck, and how the Ipad was used in the movie “2001”. I will have to kindly disagree with Mr. Newton because I do not think that technology will increase that much in just 50 years, I just don’t see that happening. Mr. Newton had some great ideas on Mass Media and how it is an assembly line production of news, but changes to digital style which is no longer similar to an assembly line. He then went on to talking about Science Fiction and how scifi writers go with their imagination, which makes sense because science fiction movies are really creative. Newton went on to say that each American generation comes of age as a different news medium is rising. Another interesting fact was how about every 80 years there has been a crisis or great awakening such as news papers in magazines, and photos in newspapers. He ended his presentation with a couple of great tips for Journalism majors:1. Learn truthful storytelling in all types of media2. Master computer assisted reporting3. Watch as much Science Fiction as you can4. Fool around with a new digital tool everyday5. Rewrite the codes of ethics in your own way

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  189. Eric Newton’s Must See Monday presentation was one of the best presentations I’ve ever seen. I had never thought of history repeating itself in such specific patterns that Eric Newton explained. His descriptions of how journalism stems through technology and is the basis of improvement for society’s timeline. Machines have always been prophesied in pop culture and media to take one the human race, and the “Singularity” event that Newton explained again added evidence to the speculation of the machine takeover. It seems as though humans are driving themselves to non-existence by improving our lives through the help of machines. However, I believe that technology will never slow down. The incentive of a higher quality of living is too high, and not many think of the potential consequences of “BioMedia” or “HyperMedia.” Eric Newton’s presentation was very interesting and sparked a lot of new ideas.

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    Tonight’s Must-See Monday was about “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 Tells Us About 2110”. To be honest, through half of the presentation by Eric Newton, an executive at the Knight Foundation of Miami, I was absolutely mind-boggled. Questions such as “We are enduring a World War 3.0?” or “Robots are going to possess our brains?” swirled through my brain like a nightmare. I could tell on by the facial reactions that an abundant amount of other attendees were also quite startled by the predictions of Mr. Newton. Nevertheless, once you started hearing about the statistics and remember the fact that history repeats itself, his predictions began rising above the fog of confusion. I always thought that the technology of our century would be quite amazing, crossing many frontiers, but I never imagined that in the next 100 years we might actually be talking through Nano technology implanted in our brains! After seeing the image of the movie “I-Robot” I remembered why I dislike super technological devices and hope that the human race does not become too dependent on them because then that would be when humans would cease to exist. It takes quite an extraordinaire to think of these absurd ideas of technology ruling the future, but Einstein was extraordinaire and look where he is now in history.

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    This week’s Must See Monday was fascinating. Being a journalist means you have to both tread lightly but shed light on critical issues. I kept having flashbacks of my Ethics class and all the times we discussed sensitivity. What is too much? How can we minimize harm? How do we remain objective?With major events, such as the Tuscon shooting, people want to be as informed as possible. There is a major demand for news and collecting it is a difficult endeavor. Remaining profession and objective is key but we are all human beings. The ethics of journalism is very tricky. I took from the discussion that when dealing with disasters and tragedies, understanding the situation is key. The best way to report is to know what people are living through. Patience is key.

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    Eric Knewton is a Senior Adviser to the president of the John S and James L. Knight Foundation. He explains that no one can tell the turn out of the digital age, science fiction equals big influence, each American generation come of age as a different news medium is rising, and people in the 20’s play a key role. We predict the future based on what we know. Eric tells us that every 80 years a crisis and a great awakening known as the light bulb, telephone, and film. He explains that the future is going to play a big role in the media. Also how there is going to be a World War 4.0 humans against non-humans. He is basically predicting the future of technology and what our world is going to become. For example, in the years 2027-2047 intelligence medias generation: visionary, cloud smart grids, robotics, and artificial intelligence. So all media will be smart, news bots, and universal data. Technology is taking over more and more every day.

  196. Today’s Must See Monday featured Eric Newton, and his presentation was about the History of the Future of News: What 1767 Tells Us About 2110. At first, I had no idea what to expect. I was not understanding the title and thought I was not going to enjoy it. I was wrong. All of the information Newton gave us was all in front of our faces the entire time, I just never put two and two together. For example, when Newton presented the pictures about Star Trek and the cell phone, 2001: A Space Odyssey and the iPad, and Skype from the Jetsons, I was in shock that I have never noticed that before. What really impressed me was how he predicted the future from the movies and television shows we have now. It is scary to me that we are expecting to have media implants that will make us humans part of technology. It is frightening! Newton said that at some point in time, people will be able to answer questions after they have passed away. It is overwhelming, but we cannot stop it now. In Newton’s words, “Each American generation comes of age as a different news medium is rising.”

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    This week’s “Must See Monday” (October 14, 2011) featured Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Newton’s presentation focused on the path of technology and its effect on news and other media outlets, specifically the social progress of “crisis” to “awakening”.By “crisis”, Newton was referring to the idea of a national or global event that had immediate negative impact on society, such as World War II. And each “crisis” occurs roughly every eighty years or so and leads to the eventual “awakening”. The “awakening” refers to the period when the culture has a major revitalization, such as the Renaissance or the Great Awakening. Newton also went on to say that if such a pattern persists into the future that society will eventually advance itself into extinction through “World War 4”, a war between humans and non-humans (machines, the environment, etc.).All in all, Newton’s presentation was awe-inspiring and a truly fantastic perception on the future of our society and journalism in the long run.

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  205. Tonight’s Must See Monday was truly inspiring, Eric Newton gave us a lot of food for thought. He emphasized how technology is ever changing in this digital age and how many of the common uses of technology nowadays were a “crazy idea” represented in the entertainment industry. For instance, the concept of video calling (aka Skype) was first in The Jetsons and the concept of cell phones was introduced in Star Trek. But these crazy futuristic ideas became realities, which shows how important it is to think outside the box in order to bring on advancements in this new age. These advancements are what will move journalism along and promote progress and that makes it so that it accommodates the general public. The focus is always on the reader and what appeals to them so it is important to accommodate them. As journalists it is important to keep updated on all these advancements and incorporate them in their work.

  206. I just attended the Must See Monday event featuring Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, discussing “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 Tells Us About 2110.” Newton gave a detailed summary about past journalistic experiences and models that have proved successful. As we advance into what is known as the “digital age,” people can see, hear, read and listen to the news at any time, Newton said. From the 1600s to the present, journalism has clearly advanced into a vastly technology-driven world. “Is this too much for 20-somethings to handle?” Newton asked. The answer to this question is debatable. At times, I feel overwhelmed with all of the different news and media that is constantly thrown into my face. Whether it is a big, graphic picture on a website or an obnoxious tweet on Twitter, I feel that I can never truly escape the media. Being a journalism student I appreciate how readily available the news is, but I would like choose how often I am exposed to that news. Do we look into the past to predict what the future holds? Newton feels that the answer could be yes. With the fast-paced technological developments made thus far, it seems only fitting that mind-reading robots and computers could be a possibility. Newton used various futuristic movies to demonstrate how ideas from the past were actually transformed into real inventions today. Newton used the famous Star Trek TV series as an example, stating that in the TV show characters used cellphone devices to communicate. Years later, the cellphone was created and later improved, allowing people to regularly check updates and read news articles in seconds. Newton stated that the inventor of the cellphone was actually inspired by the Star Trek devices in his creation of the cellphone. Newton also referenced the movie I, Robot, suggesting that perhaps robots and other inventions in films today could predict future technology developments. Newton emphasized that as technology progresses from past to present to future, how we consume the news will change as well. In the past, all people had were newspapers and now people can access any type of news at anytime from multiple devices. Could robots possibly be our future links to the news? In a seemingly digital world, it is easy to question the availability in the job market for journalists graduating college. However, Newton instilled a little confidence in the young journalist audience, stating that there will still be jobs in the future for journalists. Although most news is displayed on the Internet now, the job market will adapt to future news and media creations and outlets. Finding a successful career as a journalist in the future is simply a question of learning the new modes of communication, Newton said. I really enjoyed Newton’s presentation and I found it very informative!

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  214. The Cronkite School ended the semester with a Must See Monday that explored the great strides students are making as digital media entrepreneurs. Dan Gillmor and CJ Cornell introduced four students who accepted a challenge and dove head first into the ambiguous world of entrepreneurship. Each had their own project that proved innovation in new media is the next step in journalism. From community service to a modern day town crier the students have taken a look at what people need and how to address that need with what the community already has. The display of student projects was a glowing affirmation that we have the ability to create our own place in the world. With the intentions to inform the public around us we have the chance to secure ourselves financially as well. New media seems to be a constant in every facet of life today. With the release of the iPad, continuous updates to our favorite search engines, or the LCD screens that play while we pump our gas, the outlet for journalism is growing and these students are taking full advantage of it. This Must See Monday confirms that the Cronkite School is on the cusp of innovation; adapting to the rapid changes that effect the world of journalism every day, like the opportunities for students through the Knight Center for Digital Media Entrepreneurship, ensures that the school is molding Journalists that will thrive.

  215. Ahoj Lenchos!!Happy Birthday to Žofka!!!! I loved your christmas pics. Žofka is adorable as always!!! you seriously think that you have a ghots in your house? wow. Hope you you´ll have a nice and memorable day today along with Obamas inauguration! Greetings from Bratislava.Love,Katka

  216. Cronkite Movie Wednesday 10/26I was very excited to see “The Pelican Brief” because it stars two of my favorite actors: Julia Roberts and Denzel Washington. I was also told that the movie was a mystery, thriller type of movie and that happens to be my favorite kind of movie to watch. But enough of my personal biases; what is the movie about? Well, the story begins with two Supreme Court justices being killed. JULIA ROBERTS is a damsel in distress when she writes a brief, theorizing what and who was behind the murder of two Supreme Court justices. She ends up crating a theory that seems scarily correct. The brief manages to get into top political aides hands and it eventually lands in the lap of a reporter. DENZEL WASHINGTON is the investigative reporter who sees some merit in her theory and reluctantly decides to offer his help in tracking down the bad guys.This movie had a great plot and Washington and Roberts had a ton of chemistry on screen together. The movie is not the typical popcorn movie; you actually have to watch it and keep up, but I promise it is worth it. Politics, mystery, thrills, chemistry, and amazing actors? This masterpiece is definitely my cup of tea.

  217. The take home from this Must See Monday was:A reporter’s humanity is a strength, not a weakness. Both Ina Jaffe and Victor Merina gave numerous examples where retaining a sense of respect for subjects was instrumental to not only ethical reporting but to actually getting the story. Merina said that traumatized individuals and communities loathe “parachute reporting.” Communities tend to shut out or become hostile to reporters they perceive as being fixated on getting their “golden quote” or eight second sound bite. He urged journalists to take their time and observe the situation. By doing so, a journalist builds context and begins to gain the trust of a potentially hostile community.As I am currently enrolled in Tim McGuire’s ethics class this entire discussion sounded very familiar. I heard elements of the “golden rule” mixed with the importance of weighing truth telling against minimizing harm. I would say that Jaffe and Merina went a step forward when they agreed that a journalist’s coverage of a crisis should never make it worse. Beyond the importance of reporting ethically lay a very practical reason for acting properly. Jaffe said that it is better to get one good thing from a willing subject than forcing junk from a group of unwilling subject. Their advice may have sounded like common sense but I think it is important enough to warrant repeating:1. Take your time to get the story. Even if it takes five minutes longer, it is good journalism to wait and get the complete picture.2. Show respect.3. Minimize harm.

  218. This weeks must see Monday was “Communities in Crisis: Ethical Considerations for Journalists” and the guest speakers were Victor Merina and Ina Jaffe. I found the discussion to be very enlightening and made me think about issues that journalist have to deal with from a different perspective. Like the fact that when we are covering victims of crisis we need to look at the story as a human story and not just a breaking story. We need to keep in mind that these people are going through difficult times and we need to be patient and understanding. Victor mentioned that we need to be focussed on the long hall and follow up stories with these communities and people. The goal is not to get a “golden quote” but to build a relationship.The key term for the evening was patience. In these situations where a person has lost a loved one or there home it cannot be expected that they will be an open book. In being patient reports aren’t forcing the interviewee to discuss something they are not comfortable with. The last thing that we want is to force a person to relive a situation making the way that they are handling grief worse. The truth is that we are trying to give a humanistic perspective to disasters so that the country has more to go on then just statistics. The only way to achieve this is buy interviewing the people that had to endure the hardships of a disaster. In closing we need to try and put ourselves in the shoes of these victims and treat them the way we would like to be treated in the same situation.

  219. Eric Newton, the senior advisor to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, discussed the changing face of the future of news as part of the Muse See Monday speaker series. Newton discussed how in order to really understand how the future will shape up, you must think crazy. Newton then showed various slides and graphs that showcased the different forms of news from 1767 to 2110. Newton’s projections of the future of news may seem strange, but thinking crazy, his conclusions truly make sense. Newton discussed the numerous types of news stubbornly creeping into our futures, such as intelligent media, bio media, hyper media and omni media, all of which contain a vast amount of virtual wonders. Although at first it seems frightening that “World War 3.0”, a battle in cyberspace, is most likely going to break out, Newton emphasized how our country is effective at winning wars, and from this war, we can build news institutions and strong societies. Overall, I was especially intrigued by Newton’s presentation about the future of news. I definitely can see where he is coming from, and I believe that some of these drastic changes are definitely due for our current media.

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  223. Enjoyed your ESI class and predictions on the election. I’m not sure I can survive another debate! I will be happy when it is all over!

  224. The Knight Center for Digital Media and Entrepreneurship may be housed in the Cronkite school, but it’s not just for journalists. Students from other programs and campuses at ASU are recognizing the value of entrepreneurship in the age of technology, and their efforts are producing fantastic results.CJ Cornell, Director of the Knight Center, introduced a group of four ASU students who’s entrepreneurial endeavors are both impressive and innovative. What makes these students successful in the world of entrepreneurship? “You have to have a vision,” Cornell said, “You have to have a tolerance for risk.” And, Cornell adds, you have to find the perfect opportunity to provide a necessary service, based on consumer behavior and trends. Liz Smith spoke first, presenting thewatchtreescottsdale.com, a website she created that connects people in the Scottsdale and Gilbert suburbs with volunteer organizations in the East Valley. “We make it easier to make a difference,” Smith said. Her goal is to simplify communication between potential volunteers and the organizations that need them, which will hopefully encourage more residents of the valley to donate their time and energy to a good cause. Next, we heard from Adam Klawonn, creator of CityCirlces.com, a tool that provides the user with news, events and other helpful information based on a fixed interest point, like a light rail stop. Klawonn said that although CityCircles was inspired by Phoenix public transportation, the concept could be implemented virtually anywhere, which is was makes this project such an entrepreneurial success. Anyone who rides the light rail on a regular basis knows the value of reading material for those familiar commutes, so it was fitting that our next presenter be Amanda Crawford, developer of Fictionado. This up-and-coming software will allow people to access a database of short fiction and literature from their mobile device. “It’s the netflix for short stories,” Crawford said. The application, set to launch this summer, will be available by subscription at an affordable price. Our last presenter, Marius Ciocirlan, is a film major who initially got involved at the Knight Center with the vision of creating interactive touch-screen movie posters. His idea has since evolved into Blimee, an online platform that aims to partner with local news outlets and display breaking news, current events and other useful information on LCD screens placed all throughout the city. Ciocirlan said his goal is to make local news more accessible by bringing back “the town crier,” in a modern sense.

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  226. “The first principle in predicting the future is to think crazy.” This is what Eric Newton, Senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, said tonight at Must See Monday. Before predicting what news will be like in future generations, Newton talked about what the past generations have been like. Starting in 1767, in the Compromise generation, pamphlets were the form of media that existed. Partisan weekly newspapers came in the Transcendental generation. The Gilded generation brought populist daily newspapers. The Associated Press arrived during the Progressive generation. Illustrated magazines came in the Missionary generation. The Lost generation brought major metropolitan daily newspapers. Photography in print arrived during the G.I. generation. Radio newscasts came in the Silent generation. The Boom generation brought glossy colored magazines. TV newscasts arrived during the Gen X generation. The World Wide Web came in the Millennial generation. Mobile and social media exist in the generation we are currently in, the Cyber generation, and will be in until 2026. After talking about the media that has existed in past generations, he went on to the predictions of what media will be like in the future. He also added, “When a media pops, that’s when it shapes us and we shape it.” The generation that is predicted for 2027-2047 is the Visionary generation. This will mainly be intelligent media, including smart grids, robotics and artificial intelligence. All media will be smart. Public information will be public the moment it enters a computer. The Hybrid Generation is predicted for 2048-2068. This will be based on bio media, including nanotechnology, media implants and enhanced human capacity. People will be able to pass their life experiences on. “People will be able to ask you questions when you’re dead and your digital memory will answer,” Newton said. You could hear laughter across the room after that. The generation that is predicted for 2069-2089 is the Courageous generation. This will mainly be hyper media, including cranial downloads and thought aggregators. From 2090-2110, the generation that is predicted is the Enlightened Generation. This will be based on omni media. So what’s a journalism major to do?Newton had five main points of advice:-Learn truthful storytelling in all media.-Watch a lot more science fiction.-Rewrite codes of ethics.-Develop sources for covering World War 3.0 and new social structures that may emerge.-Play your historic role without fear or favor, balancing mind, body and soul.Newton said there are many possible reasons why the predictions may not come true, but said “they’re definitely crazy, so they might happen.”

  227. Tonight Victor Medina, a former writer for the “LA Times”, and current senior correspondent and special projects editor for Reznet, and Ina Jaffe, a national desk correspondent for NPR, discussed their experience and feelings about covering communities in crisis.I came into the lecture unsure of what I was going to learn about and whether it was going to interest me, but I came out of it with valuable knowledge on how a journalist can walk the tight rope between connecting emotionally with a grieving interviewee and maintaining professionalism. From the stories that Mr. Medina and Mrs. Jaffe told regarding their experience, I’ve realized that a reporter must have patience with their interviewees, understanding of their current sorrow and the ability to earn the trust of the people being interviewed, which is something that takes time and compassion to receive. I know being able to maintain my composure and professionalism if assigned to cover a person or community in mourning after a tragic event would be extremely difficult for me, but I’m glad I had this learning experience to get a glimpse into how a few veteran journalists have learned to deal with these difficult situations through trial and error.

  228. For tonight’s Must See Monday, we had the opportunity to hear what Eric Newton, senior advisor to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, speak about, “A History of the Future of News.” Newton said that journalism is, “a fair and intellectual search for the truth.” He spoke about how we are living in a digital age of media and explained to us communication’s exponential rise. Currently, we are in a progressive news medium, and the age is still rising. Newton said that science fiction writers use their imagination to predict what things and places will look like in the future. A few interesting examples were that the man who invented the cell phone got the idea from the phone used in the movie Star Trek, also in The Jetson’s the first version of skype was introduced. Newton explained that time comes in cycles. Depressions and crisis happens about every 80 years. The cycle of 80 years seems to persist even as information is exploding. Newton said that print media will die and most newspapers will be gone by the year 2047. By 2068, there will most likely be a machine awakening where implants of information could be placed within one’s brain. By 2099, information will be able to be downloaded into one’s brain and even after one dies, the information on the implants lives on. Newton said by this time news will simply turn into whatever we want to know and whatever we can download into our brains. Also, is the 80 year cycle continues, by 2110, World War 4 will occur. World War 4, from Newton’s standpoint will be not country against country, but more like the whole world of human beings against some type of non-human robot or creature. I found this information to be a far reach, but it definitely held my attention because science fiction shows all of these events happening mostly through movies, but it is all up in the air as to what could happen next. From a journalist’s standpoint, I am starting to believe that anything is possible.

  229. Eric Newton, the senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, spoke in the Walter Cronkite School’s first amendment forum Monday night on the future and history of news. Newton emphasized in the lecture, what 1676 tells us about 2110, that the technology we are using today seemed crazy at one point but many of the inventions we now use such as Skype, cell phones, and the iPad were seen in movies years ago. He said that every American generation grows up with a different form of media starting in 1767. In 1767 it began with pamphlets and from there media progressed to newspapers, then to daily newspapers because of the printing press, then the telegraph and so on. He also said that history shows every 80 years there is a tragedy or great awakening, for example the civil war was 80 years before WWII and we will be another time of tragedy and experience World War 3.0. He also said that there are already “cyber armies.” According to Newton, media is becoming more personal, portable, and participatory. He also said that the journalism and mass communication field is changing drastically and that print journalism will die. He predicted that in the future there will be intelligent media, bio media (which will include augmented reality), machine awareness, hyper media where data will be imported to our brains, and also Omni media where information will be exported from our brains in the form of things such as telepathy. At the conclusion of these changes he predicted there will be a World War 4.0, he said this is a war in which humans will be fighting against non-humans. At the end of this lecture he said that there are multiple reasons why this wouldn’t happen but reminded the audience that no matter how crazy it seems it is still an option.

  230. This week’s “Must See Monday” (October 14, 2011) featured Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Newton’s presentation focused on the path of technology and its effect on news and other media outlets, specifically the social progress of “crisis” to “awakening”.By “crisis”, Newton was referring to the idea of a national or global event that had immediate negative impact on society, such as World War II. And each “crisis” occurs roughly every eighty years or so and leads to the eventual “awakening”. The “awakening” refers to the period when the culture has a major revitalization, such as the Renaissance or the Great Awakening. Newton also went on to say that if such a pattern persists into the future that society will eventually advance itself into extinction through “World War 4”, a war between humans and non-humans (machines, the environment, etc.).All in all, Newton’s presentation was awe-inspiring and a truly fantastic perception on the future of our society and journalism in the long run.

  231. Tonight we had the wonderful opportunity to listen to Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. I was originally planning on attending simply because it was worth double-extra credit, however, after listening to Mr. Newton speak, I am glad that I decided to go. His lecture about the changes in media over the decades was truly intriguing. To think about where we will be in forty years is almost a scary thought. The vast advancements and changes in technology that are going to occur are enough to change the way in which we live. Interacting with another species that isn’t human is such a strange concept and I find it hard to envision how it is all going to work. It is almost worrying to think that we could be getting into World War 4.0 with a race that isn’t human. I’m not sure I want to be here when that happens. This Must See Monday was extremely interesting and kept me hooked until the very end.

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